Traditional grades tossed out; new system provides less motiviation for today’s youth

“B” is the new “A”

“C” is the new “B”

And, if you are failing, instead of seeing a big ole’ F staring back at you from a report card, parents will see an “I.”

No more Fs.

Last night, all parents within my son’s school district, with children in grades 3, 4 and 5 received a pre-recorded message informing us of the new grading system.

For lack of a better word, this is absurd from my standpoint.

In their words, “this system is to better inform the parents where their child stands” within his/her grade at school.

This is what I heard:

“We are changing the grading system because some parents were complaining that their children were doing the best they can and were still failing. We don’t like it that little Johnny is FAILING math. We don’t like it that little Susie is failing English. And, we certainly don’t like seeing a big ole’ F at their report cards. They are doing the best they can …”

I am sorry, but I had to work my ass off to get A and Bs. If I received a C on my report card (typically this only happened in dreaded MATH), I had privileges taken away. I had to study harder.

Imagine that. Privileges revoked and I had to STUDY.

My “job” as a young member of society was to go to school and do well.

It wasn’t my parent’s job to make sure I studied. I knew what was coming my way if I did poorly.

I wasn’t one of those children who were “paid” by the letter.

Instead, when I received all good grades – As and Bs – I felt PROUD of myself knowing all of the hard work and studying paid off.

But now, times, they are a changin’ – for the worst I am afraid.

In order to receive an “M” – which stands for mastery – children must  receive an 85 to 100 percent on a given assignment; a “P” – which stands for proficient – will be given if a child receives a 70 to 84 percent (back in my day, a 70 percent was borderline D); and “I” – which means intervention needed (ya think?) – will be given to children who received a 0 to 69 percent on overall work.

So, basically, they are telling children that it’s OK to slack off now, because hell, instead of needing a 93 percent to receive an “A,” you can get an 85 percent (a B back in my school days) and still be considered a “MASTER.”

Really?

I want to know how this new and “better” grading system is going to hold up in the real world.

Perhaps if people show up 84 percent of the time, they will be rewarded instead of being fired?

As a parent, I saw nothing wrong with the old system.

And, as my dad would day (who is a retired teacher), “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it …”

 

 

Advertisements

About Parenthood: The New Crazy Train

Parenthood is no easy task, and there is no reason to go at it alone. So, if you are feeling like the weight of the world is on your shoulders, dump it off, grab a beverage and hop onboard Parenthood: The New Crazy Train -- where we are all permanent riders and new riders are welcomed daily. Follow me on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/ParenthoodthenewCrazyTrain Twitter @train_crazy *Photo credit Kristin Bauer*
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Traditional grades tossed out; new system provides less motiviation for today’s youth

  1. Grandpa Linebrink says:

    the standards for the following will also be impacted:
    Food Processing standards–arrest–attendance at school/work/political offices(which are poor now)
    leadership of any kind/the BAR has been lowered just show up we’ll pass you and pay you———-
    AND BLAME EVERYONE ELSE WHEN IT ALL FALLS APART—-our poor grandchildren will
    pay the price and wonder who made this blunder!! @ the current administration

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s